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New Book List 6      



The Scientific Exploration of Mars

What do we know about Mars? What remains to be understood? Is there evidence of life there? Will humans ever travel there? The dream of exploring Mars has been around since the early days of human civilization and still forms part of our vision of the future for the human race. Today, we send unmanned spacecraft to explore this neighboring world to examine its climate, search for evidence of past or present life, and learn how conditions there relate to those on Earth. Plans are now being prepared for a manned mission to Mars, set against an uncertain background of political, practical, technical and financial considerations. This unique book provides a complete description of the past, present and future of Mars exploration. Written by a scientist intimately involved with missions to Mars, it provides a personal first-hand account. It will appeal to anyone interested in this fascinating planet.
 

What is Happening to News?

In the face of all the problems plaguing serious news, What Is Happening to News explores the crucial question of how journalism lost its way—and who is responsible for the ragged retreat from its great traditions. Veteran editor and newspaperman Jack Fuller locates the surprising sources of change where no one has thought to look before: in the collision between a revolutionary new information age and a human brain that is still wired for the threats faced by our prehistoric ancestors. Drawing on the dramatic recent discoveries of neuroscience, Fuller explains why the information overload of contemporary life makes us dramatically more receptive to sensational news, while rendering the staid, objective voice of standard journalism ineffective. Throw in a growing distrust of experts and authority, ably capitalized on by blogs and other interactive media, and the result is a toxic mix that threatens to prove fatal to journalism as we know it.
 

Preaching with Sacred Fire: an Anthology of African American Sermons

Sermons by African American preachers have sustained, inspired, educated, and thrilled their congregations through slavery, Jim Crow and the various permutations of racism, and both good times and bad. This book offers a collection of sermons from the mid-eighteenth-century period to the present. It begins by exploring the African roots of black preaching and the principles of black preaching, particularly the centrality of the Bible as a living text, though the collection is a cross section of Christian denominations and nondenominations. The book explores the traditions of call and response and whooping, as well as the styles that gave inspiration to musical genres from gospel to blues to jazz to rap. Each section offers a brief historical overview and brief biography of the featured preacher followed by the sermons. Among the featured preachers are Alexander Crummell, Julia Foote, Sojourner Truth, Zora Neale Hurston, Noble Drew Ali, James Weldon Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Louis Farrakhan, Peter Gomes, Jesse Jackson, T. D. Jakes, and Jeremiah Wright.
 

Healthy Foods: Fact Versus Ficton

This highly accessible guide reviews research regarding the health benefits of 50 common foods. It is a quick read but does not need to be read cover to cover; users are likely to flip directly to entries on their favorite foods. Entries for each food are three to five pages in length and arranged alphabetically. Written for laypeople as much as possible, each entry begins with a brief history of the food and then summarizes medical and nutritional research regarding its potential health benefits and potential disadvantages. For example, based on medial and nutritional research, eggs are identified as contributing to a healthy weight-loss program and kiwis as beneficial to cardiovascular health. Entries end with a list of references to further reading and resources for more information about the food item under discussion. A useful glossary of medical and nutritional terms is included.
 

Shakespeare in an Hour

In 1587, when William Shakespeare was twenty-three, the acting troupe Queen's Men played in his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon with one player short. Shakespeare's childhood fascination with theater suddenly found a perfect outlet — he joined the Queen's Men and replaced the missing actor. Shortly thereafter young William traveled to London in pursuit of an acting career. But acting soon gave way to an even more glorious adventure when Shakespeare realized that he might have a talent for writing plays.
Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of Shakespeare and the plays he wrote. Read Shakespeare in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!
 

Physics of the Human Body

Richard P. McCall's fascinating book explains how basic concepts of physics apply to the fundamental activities and responses of the human body, a veritable physics laboratory.
Each chapter discusses a fundamental physics concept and relates it to the anatomy and physiology of applicable parts of the body. Topics include motion, fluids and pressure, temperature and heat, speech and hearing, electrical behaviors, optics, biological effects of radiation, and drug concentrations. Clear and compelling, with a limited amount of math, McCall's descriptions allow readers of all levels to appreciate the physics of the human physique.
 

How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching

In this volume, the authors introduce seven general principles of learning, distilled from the research literature as well as from twenty-seven years of experience working one-on-one with college faculty. They have drawn on research from a breadth of perspectives (cognitive, developmental, and social psychology; educational research; anthropology; demographics; and organizational behavior) to identify a set of key principles underlying learning-from how effective organization enhances retrieval and use of information to what impacts motivation. These principles provide instructors with an understanding of student learning that can help them see why certain teaching approaches are or are not supporting student learning, generate or refine teaching approaches and strategies that more effectively foster student learning in specific contexts, and transfer and apply these principles to new courses.
 

The Big Payback: the History of the Business of Hip-Hop

The Big Payback takes us from the first $15 made by a "rapping DJ" in 1970s New York to the recent multi-million-dollar sales of the Phat Farm and Roc-a-Wear clothing companies in 2004 and 2007. On this four-decade-long journey from the studios where the first rap records were made to the boardrooms where the big deals were inked, The Big Payback tallies the list of who lost and who won. Read the secret histories of the early long-shot successes of Sugar Hill Records and Grandmaster Flash, Run DMC's crossover breakthrough on MTV, the marketing of gangsta rap, and the rise of artist/ entrepreneurs like Jay-Z and Sean "Diddy" Combs. 300 industry veterans-well-known giants like Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons, the founders of Def Jam, and key insiders like Gerald Levin, the embattled former Time Warner chief-gave their stories to renowned hip-hop journalist Dan Charnas, who provides a compelling, never-before seen, myth-debunking view into the victories, defeats, corporate clashes, and street battles along the 40-year road to hip-hop's dominance.
 

Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World

In Always On, Naomi S. Baron reveals that online and mobile technologies—including instant messaging, cell phones, multitasking, Facebook, blogs, and wikis—are profoundly influencing how we read and write, speak and listen, but not in the ways we might suppose. Baron draws on a decade of research to provide an eye-opening look at language in an online and mobile world. Electronic media has magnified the laid-back "whatever" attitude toward formal writing that young people everywhere have embraced, but it is not a cause of it. Moreover, as more and more people are "always on" one technology or another—whether communicating, working, or just surfing the web or playing games—we have to ask what kind of people we are becoming, as individuals and as family members or friends, if the relationships we form must increasingly compete for our attention with digital media.
 

Dinner with Mugabe

With plunging life expectancy, soaring inflation, and unemployment, repression, and starvation fueling a mass exodus, Zimbabwe is a nation in crisis. Its president, Robert Mugabe-once lauded for his heroics as a guerilla leader who fought against white-minority rule in the 1960s- is now seen as the man who ruined the country and cast shame on the African continent. Beginning with a dinner shared with Mugabe the freedom fighter and ending in a searching interview with Mugabe as Zimbabwe's president more than thirty years later, Heidi Holland's incisive and timely investigation charts Mugabe's gradual self- destruction and probes the mystery of Africa's loyalty to one of its worst dictators.
 

Queer Questions, Clear Answers

This provocative book examines the important issues in contemporary debates on sexual orientation—from our various religious beliefs to our stereotypes about homosexuals, from questions about the origin of sexual orientation to the lessons we can learn from history.
 

Essential Supreme Court Decisions

This landmark book has long been the gold standard of concise summaries of important U.S. Supreme Court cases in U.S. constitutional law. The book incorporates every facet of constitutional law, including the powers and privileges of the three branches of the national government, federalism, war powers, and extensive briefs on civil rights and liberties. This new edition has been thoroughly revised, reorganized, and updated through the end of the 2008 term.
 

Probabilities: the Little Numbers that Rule our Lives

From probable improbabilities to regular irregularities, Probabilities: The Little Numbers That Rule Our Lives investigates the often-surprising effects of risk and chance in our everyday lives. With examples ranging from WWII espionage to the O. J. Simpson trial, from bridge to blackjack, from Julius Caesar to Jerry Seinfeld, the reader is taught how to think straight in a world of randomness and uncertainty.
 

Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

For more than two hundred years after William Shakespeare's death, no one doubted that he had written his plays. Since then, however, dozens of candidates have been proposed for the authorship of what is generally agreed to be the finest body of work by a writer in the English language. In this remarkable book, Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro explains when and why so many people began to question whether Shakespeare wrote his plays. Among the doubters have been such writers and thinkers as Sigmund Freud, Henry James, Mark Twain, and Helen Keller. It is a fascinating story, replete with forgeries, deception, false claimants, ciphers and codes, conspiracy theories—and a stunning failure to grasp the power of the imagination.
 

New GRE Premier

Kaplan New GRE 2011-2012 Premier with CD-ROM is a comprehensive package that includes a book, CD-ROM, and online companion with in-depth strategies, test information, and practice questions to help students score higher on the new GRE Revised General Test. Kaplan New GRE 2011-2012 Premier with CD-ROM is fully updated and revised with 75 percent all-new content covering the revised and expanded Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing Assessment Test sections, including 50 percent new practice questions and brand new strategies for each of the new question types.
 

Robot Building for Beginners

Learning robotics by yourself isnt easy, but it helps when the encouragement comes from an expert whos spent years in the field. Not only does Author David Cook assist you in understanding the component parts of robot development, but he also presents valuable techniques that prepare you to achieve new discoveries on your own. Cook begins with the anatomy of a homemade robot and gives you the best advice on how to proceed successfully. General sources for tools and parts are provided in a consolidated list, and specific parts are recommended throughout the book. Specific tools and parts covered include digital multimeters, motors, wheels, resistors, LEDs, photoresistors, transistors, chips, gears, nut drivers, batteries, and more. Robot Building for Beginners is an inspiring book that provides an essential base of practical knowledge for anyone getting started in amateur robotics.
 

Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior

We've all heard that a father's involvement enriches the lives of children. But how much have we heard about how having a child affects a father's life? As Peter Gray and Kermyt Anderson reveal, fatherhood actually alters a man's sexuality, rewires his brain, and changes his hormonal profile. His very health may suffer—in the short run—and improve in the long. These are just a few aspects of the scientific side of fatherhood explored in this book, which deciphers the findings of myriad studies and makes them accessible to the interested general reader.
 

Concise History of Science & Invention

This concise, concentrated, consistently organized look at our species’ key scientific and innovative achievements spans all human history, presenting ten distinct eras from the first glimmers of intelligence to the cutting-edge technologies of the modern world. Special two-page feature spreads explore the most revolutionary developments in greater depth; compelling, expertly composed essays and memorable quotations add sparkle; and informative sidebars provide specifically focused items of information about particular inventions, ideas, or themes. Completing this comprehensive approach, an extensive glossary explains unfamiliar terms, and a detailed index makes it a simple matter to follow a particular field or process from its origin through its complete cross-cultural evolution.
 

The Watchers: the Rise of America's Surveillance State

Harris, a reporter for National Journal, details the rise of a band of mavericks in national security and intelligence organizations that has erected an American surveillance state. In this timely and admirably balanced account, Harris focuses on the role of a handful of key figures, including Reagan-era National Security Adviser John Poindexter, as they campaigned for information technology to identify terrorists.. Harris carefully examines how the nexus between terrorism and technology has complicated the age-old conflict between security and liberty and calls for a national debate on the issue.
 

When Our World Became Christian

This short book by one of France's leading historians deals with a big question: how was it that Christianity, that masterpiece of religious invention, managed, between 300 and 400 AD, to impose itself upon the whole of the Western world? In his erudite and inimitable way, Paul Veyne suggests three possible explanations. In the course of deciding between these explanations Paul Veyne sheds fresh light on one of the most profound transformations that shaped the modern world - the Christianization of the West. A bestseller in France, this book will appeal to a wide readership interested in history, religion and the rise of the modern world.
 

The African American Entrepreneur: Then and Now

The African American Entreprenuer: Then and Now explores the lower economic status of black Americans in light of America's legacy of slavery, segregation, and rampant discrimination. Its main purpose is to shine a light on the legal, historical, sociological and political factors that together help to explain the economic condition of black people in America from their arrival in America to the present. In the process, the book spotlights the many amazing breakthroughs made by black entrepreneurs even before the Civil War and Emancipation. As Rogers points out, reading about remarkable African American entrepreneurs can inspire readers to adopt an entrepreneurial mindset. To further that goal and help readers take the plunge, he outlines many of the skills, tools and information necessary for business success-success that can help chart a new path to prosperity for all African Americans.
 

Alexander the Great

This is the first publication in English of Pierre Briant's classic short history of Alexander the Great's conquest of the Persian empire, from the Mediterranean to Central Asia.After a short account of Alexander's life before his landing in Asia Minor, the book gives a brief overview of the major stages of his conquest. This background sets the stage for a series of concise thematic chapters that explore the origins and objectives of the conquest; the nature and significance of the resistance it met; the administration, defense, and exploitation of the conquered lands; the varying nature of Alexander's relations with the Macedonians, Greeks, and Persians; and the problems of succession following Alexander's death.
 

The Brother/Sister Plays

This is the first collection by Tarell Alvin McCraney, a major new playwright of the American theater. Lyrical and mythic, provocative and contemporary, McCraney’s dramas of kinship, love, and heartache are set in the bayou of Louisiana and loosely draw on West African myths. In the Red and Brown Water charts the story of Oya, a fast and beautiful track star who must make difficult choices on her journey to womanhood. The Brothers Size dramatizes the struggle between brothers who have taken different paths: Ogun, single-mindedly running his auto shop, and Oshoosi, recently returned from prison and fallen back with trouble. Marcus; or the Secret of Sweet explores a young man’s relationship with his history and friends as he discovers his sexuality and true self against the backdrop of an impending storm.
 

Women's Right: People and Perspective

In this social history, DeLuzio assembles 12 chapters by historians and women's studies scholars from the US on the struggle for women's rights throughout American history. Chapters survey prominent theorists, women, and political organizers and leaders, as well as ordinary women who played a role in women's rights. Topics include women's rights from the colonial period up to the 1970s; issues such as suffrage, economic independence, reproductive rights, and racial equality; the rights of Native American women; education in the nineteenth and twentieth century; the ongoing movement for women's rights in the present day; and how multiple categories of identity affect women's responses to social inequality and oppression. Primary source documents such as the Declaration of Sentiments, the National American Woman Suffrage Association's 'Why Women Should Vote,' and a letter from the editors of BUST magazine are included.
 

The Emperor's New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth

When he began a new research project on antidepressants and placebos practicing psychotherapist and research psychologist Kirsch was surprised to uncover evidence that inadequate supervision by the FDA had allowed pharmaceutical companies to cherry-pick test results for publication and submission to the feds, suppressing unwanted outcomes; further, apparent evidence of active drugs' effectiveness when compared to placebos could often be attributed to patients correctly guessing which group they were in based on the side effects (or the lack thereof) they had come to expect in conjunction with anti-depressants. When his results were published in early 2008, Kirsch was surprised to find himself and his research the subject of front page newspaper stories, TV and radio coverage, and a vigorous debate in the medical community that continues to this day. Writing with a broad audience in mind, Kirsch expands on this important topic in a lively style with clear, cogent explanations of the science involved, and many examples of the differences between solid and flawed research.
 

Muhammad and the Believers: at the Origins of Islam

In Muhammad and the Believers, the eminent historian Fred Donner offers a lucid and original vision of how Islam first evolved. He argues that the origins of Islam lie in what we may call the "Believers' movement" begun by the prophet Muhammad—a movement of religious reform emphasizing strict monotheism and righteous behavior in conformity with God's revealed law. The Believers' movement thus included righteous Christians and Jews in its early years, because like the Qur'anic Believers, Christians and Jews were monotheists and agreed to live righteously in obedience to their revealed law. The conviction that Muslims constituted a separate religious community, utterly distinct from Christians and Jews, emerged a century later, when the leaders of the Believers' movement decided that only those who saw the Qur'an as the final revelation of the One God and Muhammad as the final prophet, qualified as Believers. This separated them decisively from monotheists who adhered to the Gospels or Torah.
 

The Numbers Game

The radical premise of The Numbers Game is to show how much we already know and give practical ways to use our knowledge to become cannier consumers of the media. If you've ever wondered what "average" really means, whether the scare stories about cancer risk should convince you to change your behavior, or whether a story you read in the paper is biased (and how), you need this book. Blastland and Dilnot show how to survive and thrive on the torrent of numbers that pours through everyday life.
 

Daily Life During the Reformation

Organized thematically, Daily Life during the Reformation covers the hectic and tumultuous years between 1517 and 1648, allowing readers to discover what it was like for ordinary people during this critical period and to compare events and living conditions in early Modern Europe with those of today. With the help of eyewitness accounts, the book focuses on the lives of the people, the conditions in which they lived and died, their roles in the unfolding events of the Reformation, and the Reformation's effects on them. Leading protagonists are described, as are their beliefs and the impact of those beliefs on the population in general and in particular cases. The book also explores, for example, the medical practice of the time, which, while not considered black magic, was close to it.
 

How to Cool the Planet

In How to Cool the Planet, Jeff Goodell explores the scientific, political, and moral aspects of geoengineering. How are we going to change the temperature of whole regions if we can’t even predict next week’s weather? What about wars waged with climate control as the primary weapon? There are certainly risks, but Goodell persuades us that geoengineering may be our last best hope, a Plan B for the environment. And if it is, we need to know enough to get it right.
 

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

The Scientific American Brave New Brain offers a fast-forward look at what's in store for our brains in the very near future—a world where science fiction becomes science fact. Lightning-quick advances in neuroscience are bringing amazing treatments and startling predictions of what we can expect to both better and boost our brains. This remarkable book reveals what lies ahead over the next few decades and what exists now in brain treatments with biochemistry, drugs, computers, electrical treatments, stem cells, brain chips, and gene manipulation—and the legal, ethical, and moral fallout of all this change and progress. This comprehensive and entertaining look at the wonders in your brain's very near future is written and edited by Judith Horstman, based on the newest research and articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines.
 
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