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Spring 2012 New Book List(7)      



100 Media Moments that Changed America

From the launching of America's first newspaper to YouTube's latest phone-videoed crime, the media has always been guilty of indulging America's obsession with controversy. This encyclopedia covers 100 events in world history from the 17th century to the present—moments that alone were major and minor, but ones that exploded in the public eye when the media stepped in. Topics covered include yellow journalism, the War of the Worlds radio broadcast, the Kennedy-Nixon debates, JFK's assassination, the Pentagon papers, and Hurricane Katrina.

The Art of Invention: the Creative Process of Discovery and Design

Our world today is filled with technological marvels that not long ago seemed like fanciful science fiction. How did these techno-wonders come to be the popular items we now take for granted as common place? The Art of Invention takes readers "behind the scenes" to peer into the process of invention and to explore the principles of creative problem solving, needfinding, design, and entrepreneurship, through both personal examples and case studies of successful inventions. While the focus of the book is on the creative process, it is the elements of design-simplicity, elegance, and robustness-that Paley considers essential to many great inventions.

Autobiography of Mark Twain

In celebration of this important milestone and in honor of the cherished tradition of publishing Mark Twain's works, UC Press is proud to offer for the first time Mark Twain's uncensored autobiography in its entirety and exactly as he left it. This major literary event brings to readers, admirers, and scholars the first of three volumes and presents Mark Twain's authentic and unsuppressed voice, brimming with humor, ideas, and opinions, and speaking clearly from the grave as he intended.

The American Drug Scene

The American Drug Scene, Sixth Edition, features forty-two selections that cover all abused drugs—amphetamines and methamphetamines, opiates, marijuana, cocaine and crack, hallucinogens, and "club drugs"—as well as such legal substances as alcohol, tobacco, and prescription drugs. Other topics include gender and addiction; cross-cultural research into drug use; the relationship between drugs, violence, and street crime; the symbolic meaning of drug taking; injection drug use; the social construction of drug problems and moral panics; prevention and treatment; and the drug legalization debate.

A History of the Popes: From Peter to the Present

A History of the Popes tells the story of the oldest living institution in the Western world—the papacy. From its origins in Saint Peter, Jesus' chief disciple, through Pope Benedict XVI today, the popes have been key players in virtually all of the great dramas of the western world in the last two thousand years. Acclaimed church historian John W. O'Malley's engaging narrative examines the 265 individuals who have claimed to be Peter's successors. Rather than describe each pope one by one, the book focuses on the popes that shaped pivotal moments in both church and world history. The author does not shy away from controversies in the church, and includes legends like Pope Joan and a comprehensive list of popes and antipopes to help readers get a full picture of the papacy.

The Politics of American Education

Turning his distinctive analytical lens to the politics of American education, Joel Spring looks at contemporary educational policy issues from theoretical, practical, and historical perspectives. This comprehensive overview documents and explains who influences educational policy and how, bringing to life the realities of schooling in the 21st century and revealing the ongoing ideological struggles at play. Coverage includes the influence of global organizations on American school policies and the impact of emerging open source and other forms of electronic textbooks.

The Craft of Piano Playing: a New Approach to Piano Technique

In The Craft of Piano Playing, master pianist Alan Fraser offers readers an original and comprehensive approach to piano technique, offering over 100 illustrations and a series of unique exercises to guide the reader. Drawing on his many years as a performer and teacher, his long-standing collaborations with pedagogue Phil Cohen and virtuoso Kemal Gekich, and his professional training in the Feldenkrais Method, Fraser introduces his truly innovative piano technique by teaching how to move your hands, linking your physical technique to musical expression, and keeping your hands healthy.

Forensics and Fiction

How long can someone survive in a cold, damp cave without food or water? How was diphtheria treated in 1886? Can Botox kill? Can DNA be found on a knife years later? How are mummified corpses identified? As a consultant to many novelists around the world and to the writers of such popular TV shows as Monk, Law & Order, House, and CSI: Miami, D. P. Lyle, M.D., has answered many cool, clever, and oddball questions over the years. Forensics and Fiction: Clever, Intriguing, and Downright Odd Questions from Crime Writers is a collection of the best of these questions. The answers are provided in a concise and entertaining fashion that will keep you wide awake so you can read "just one more."

The Ethnic Press: Shaping the American Dream

Millions of people have come to America seeking a different life than the one they had in their home country. In documenting the history of immigrants in America through the lens of their newspapers, this groundbreaking book offers a new interpretation, illuminating how ethnic presses in America helped to shape the American Dream. Moreover, the book shows how the ethnic press continues to reshape this dream, as its function has changed from one of acculturation to assimilation to cultural pluralism targeted at the immigrant audience. The similarities between the newspapers, whether they were sojourner, political, religious, or literary in form, provide a fresh perspective on the shaping of the American Dream.

The Rowman & Littlefield Guide to Writing with Sources

The Rowman & Littlefield Guide to Writing with Sources offers a thorough and up-to-date discussion of plagiarism and the proper use of sources. The third edition, with new introductory material using current events to highlight the importance of writing ethics and clarity, incorporates the latest revisions to MLA, CSE, and CMS styles. Featuring sample writing and style sheets, this succinct handbook helps writers of all levels and disciplines to assess, quote, cite, and present information from a variety of sources.

Blue Rage, Black Redemption: a Memoir

Crips co-founder Stanley Tookie Williams was convicted of murdering four people and was sent to death row in 1981. However, Tookie maintained his innocence and began to work in earnest to prevent others from following his path. Whether he was creating nationwide peace protocols, discouraging adolescents from joining gangs, or writing books, Tookie worked tirelessly for the rest of his life to end gang violence. By turns frightening and enlightening, Blue Rage, Black Redemption is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and an invaluable lesson in how rage can be turned into redemption.

Sculpture Today

Over the past three decades, sculpture has retaken its position at the forefront of contemporary art, with artists redefining the medium in remarkable and revolutionary ways. SCULPTURE TODAY is the only book to provide such a wide-ranging and richly-illustrated overview of contemporary sculpture. Thematic chapters examine the diverse subjects that have inspired sculptors in recent years, including the body, gravity, color, light, architecture, and clothing. A wide range of works is discussed, offering an insight into the incredible range of ideas, styles, materials, techniques, and locations explored in this versatile genre.

Plagues in World History

Plagues in World History provides a concise, comparative world history of catastrophic infectious diseases, including plague, smallpox, tuberculosis, cholera, influenza, and AIDS. Geographically, these diseases have spread across the entire globe; temporally, they stretch from the sixth century to the present. The author argues that the ability of humans to alter disease, even without the modern wonders of antibiotic drugs and other medical treatments, is an even more crucial lesson to learn now that AIDS, swine flu, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and other seemingly incurable illnesses have raged worldwide. Aberth's comparative analysis of how different societies have responded in the past to disease illuminates what cultural approaches have been and may continue to be most effective in combating the plagues of today.

Sudan: Darfur, Islamism, and the World

In this fascinating and immensely readable book, the Africa editor of the Economist gives an absorbing account of Sudan’s descent into failure and what some have called genocide. Drawing on interviews with many of the main players, Richard Cockett explains how and why Sudan has disintegrated, looking in particular at the country’s complex relationship with the wider world. He shows how the United States and Britain were initially complicit in Darfur—but also how a broad coalition of human-rights activists, right-wing Christians, and opponents of slavery succeeded in bringing the issues to prominence in the United States and creating an impetus for change at the highest level.

The Atom and the Apple: 12 Tales of Contemporary Physics

Where is mankind located in the Universe? What goes on inside atoms? Was Einstein always right? Will we find extraterrestrial life in the near future? And what should be done about global warming? Sbastien Balibar, a leading authority in physics, uses illuminating stories from his own life to answer the most intriguing questions in the physical sciences today. The Atom and the Apple considers aspects of our environment--the things we see around us, but seldom truly understand--and shows that science can be an exciting adventure grounded in the phenomena of the daily world.

The Amazing Journey of American Women

A comprehensive mix of oral history and Gail Collins's keen research--covering politics, fashion, popular culture, economics, sex, families, and work--When Everything Changed is the definitive book on five crucial decades of progress. The enormous strides made since 1960 include the advent of the birth control pill, the end of "Help Wanted--Male" and "Help Wanted--Female" ads, and the lifting of quotas for women in admission to medical and law schools. Gail Collins describes what has happened in every realm of women's lives, partly through the testimonies of both those who made history and those who simply made their way.

The Heritage Series of Black Poetry: 1962-1975

This innovative volume brings together never-before-published primary works and extensive bibliographic resources on this groundbreaking publishing venture. Materials include memoirs, retrospectives, bibliographies, and detailed archival information that are essential to scholars working in the fields of twentieth-century black poetry, transatlantic studies, and book history.

The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Quest for what Makes Us Human

In this new book, author V. S. Ramachandran sets his sights on the mystery of human uniqueness. Taking us to the frontiers of neurology, he reveals what baffling and extreme case studies can teach us about normal brain function and how it evolved. Ramachandran tackles the most exciting and controversial topics in neurology with a storyteller's eye for compelling case studies and a researcher's flair for new approaches to age-old questions. Tracing the strange links between neurology and behavior, this book unveils a wealth of clues into the deepest mysteries of the human brain.

The Rise and Fall of the Bible

In this revelatory exploration of one of our most revered icons, a critically acclaimed author and professor takes us back to early Christianity to ask how a box of handwritten scrolls became the Bible, and forward to see how the multibillion-dollar business that has brought us Biblezines and Manga Bibles is selling down the Bible’s sacred capital. Showing us how a single official text was created from the proliferation of different scripts, Beal traces its path as it became embraced as the word of God and Book of books. In calling for a fresh understanding of the ways scriptures were used in the past, he offers the chance to rediscover a Bible, and a faith, that is truer to its own history—not a book of answers but a library of questions.

Styles, Schools, & Movements

Art in the modern era has come to be defined by its styles, schools, and movements. The more than three hundred collected here provide an essential introduction to the major developments in Western painting, sculpture, architecture, and design during one of the most dynamic and exciting periods in art history. More than one hundred main entries are presented in broadly chronological order, from Impressionism and Cubism to Sound Art, Internet Art, and Art Photography in the twenty-first century. Two hundred supplementary entries provide fully cross-referenced summaries of additional styles and movements, tracing patterns of influence and development. A timeline shows at a glance how the evolution of art corresponds with historical events, providing a thorough overview of the period.

Truth Machine: The Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting

DNA profiling—commonly known as DNA fingerprinting—is often heralded as unassailable criminal evidence, a veritable “truth machine” that can overturn convictions based on eyewitness testimony, confessions, and other forms of forensic evidence. But DNA evidence is far from infallible. Truth Machine traces the controversial history of DNA fingerprinting by looking at court cases in the United States and United Kingdom beginning in the mid-1980s, when the practice was invented, and continuing until the present. Ultimately, Truth Machine presents compelling evidence of the obstacles and opportunities at the intersection of science, technology, sociology, and law.

Journalism Today: a Themed History

Journalism Today: A Themed History provides a cultural approach to journalism's history through the exploration of overarching concepts, as opposed to a typical chronological overview. Rich with illuminating stories and biographies of key figures, it sheds new light on the relationship between the press and society and how each has shaped the other. This book offers thematic study of the history of journalism, examining the role of journalism in democracy, the influence of new technology, and the challenge of balancing ethical value. The authors situate journalism in a rich cultural context with lively examples and case studies that bring the subject alive for contemporary readers.

Cabin, Quarter, Plantation: Architecture and Landscapes of North American Slavery

This important work brings together the best writing in the field, including classic pieces on slave landscapes by W. E. B. DuBois and Dell Upton, alongside new essays on such topics as the building methods that Africans brought to the American South and information about slave family units and spiritual practices that can be gathered from archaeological remains. Through deep analysis of the built environment the authors invite us to reconsider antebellum buildings, landscapes, cabins, yards, and garden plots, and what these sites can teach us about the real conditions of enslavement. The starting point in any study of slavery and the built environment, this anthology makes essential contributions to our understanding of American slavery and to the fields of landscape history and architectural history.

Children Behaving Badly?: Peer Violence Between Children and Young People

By gathering together the most updated international research and expert commentary on peer violence issues from across the childhood spectrum, this volume directly addresses the complexity of this troubling issue. Contributions throughout the text reveal how childhood is not a homogenous experience but fragmented by gender, ethnicity, sexuality and poverty. Other issues explored include pre-school children and peer violence, bullying, youth gangs, knife crime, teenage partner violence, sibling abuse, homophobia, international media depictions of violent youth, and implications for professionals working with children and young people.

Cultures of War: Pearl Harbor/Hiroshima/9-11/Iraq

This book examines the cultures of war revealed by four powerful events—Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, 9-11, and the invasion of Iraq in the name of a war on terror. The list of issues examined and themes explored is wide-ranging: failures of intelligence and imagination, wars of choice and “strategic imbecilities,” faith-based secular thinking as well as more overtly holy wars, the targeting of noncombatants, and the almost irresistible logic—and allure—of mass destruction. One of the most important books of this decade, Cultures of War offers comparative insights into individual and institutional behavior and pathologies that transcend “cultures” in the more traditional sense, and that ultimately go beyond war-making alone.

Driven to Extinction: The Impact of Climate Change on Biodiversity

Could more than a million species disappear in the 21st century? Written by a leading scientist in the field, Driven to Extinction draws upon fascinating case studies from around the world, providing balanced and well-reasoned insight into the potential impacts of climate change on the diversity of life. Richard Pearson focuses on the science of the issue, revealing what has happened as well as what is likely to happen to some of the world's weirdest and most wonderful species as global temperatures continue to rise.

One Click: Jeff Bezos and the Rise of Amazon.com

Why has Amazon been so successful? Much of it has to do with Jeff Bezos, the CEO and founder, whose unique combination of character traits and business strategy have driven Amazon to the top of the online retail world. Richard Brandt charts Bezos's rise from computer nerd to world- changing entrepreneur. Through interviews with Amazon employees, competitors, and observers, Brandt has deciphered how Bezos makes decisions. The story of Amazon's ongoing evolution is a case study in how to reinvent an entire industry, and one that anyone in business today ignores at their peril.

The Story of Graphic Design

The Story of Graphic Design is a compelling narrative that explores the evolution of styles under the pressure of social, cultural, and technological change, accompanied by a comprehensive selection of illustrations of key works in typography and design since the invention of writing. It covers a remarkable number of topics, from the art of the medieval manuscript to the birth of advertising to the workings of modern mass media. Unlike all other historians of design, Patrick Cramsie is able to bring a designer's eye to the analysis of visual communication.

The Powers that Be: Global Energy for the 21st Century and Beyond

With this book, Scott Montgomery cuts through the hype to give us a straightforward, informed account of where we are now, and a map of where we’re going. Starting with the inescapable fact of our current dependence on fossil fuels—which supply 80% of all our energy needs today—Montgomery clearly and carefully lays out the many alternative energy options available, ranging from the familiar, like water and solar, to such nascent but promising sources as hydrogen and geothermal power. What is crucial, Montgomery explains, is understanding that our future will depend not on some single, wondrous breakthrough; instead, we should focus on developing a more diverse, adaptable energy future, one that draws on a variety of sources—and is thus less vulnerable to disruption or failure.

The Price of Freedom Denied: Religious Persecution and Conflict in the 21st Century

The Price of Freedom Denied shows that, contrary to popular opinion, ensuring religious freedom for all reduces violent religious persecution and conflict and that restricting religious freedoms is associated with higher levels of violent persecution. Relying on a new source of coded data for nearly 200 countries and case studies of six countries, the book offers a global profile of religious freedom and religious persecution. Grim and Finke report that persecution is evident in all regions and is standard fare for many. They also find that religious freedoms are routinely denied and that government and the society at large serve to restrict these freedoms. They conclude that the price of freedom denied is high indeed.
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