Health Services

The primary goal of Health Services is to leverage educational and service-oriented resources at HBCUs to positively impact the health and well being of its student body.

Lane provides physical and mental care services right on campus. Our professional and compassionate team are committed to your success and overall well-being.

Our Offices of Student Health and Counseling Services provide your home for physical and mental health care while you’re at Lane.

SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Physician exams and care
  • Emotional support and therapy including trauma resolution
  • Prescription and over-the-counter medications
  • Preventative medicine and wellness promotion programs
  • Referrals to private providers for specialty, urgent and emergency care
  • Health screenings (blood pressure, sickle-cell anemia, etc.)
  • STD testing, treatment and counseling
  • Health information and training materials
  • Limited laboratory testing
  • Collaborative health programs and alliances
  • Health education
  • Substance abuse treatment and education
  • Women’s clinic support
  • Sexual health


THE HBCU WELLNESS PROJECT

Abbreviated for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), the HBCU Wellness Project is an intervention designed to utilize the human and social capital at private historically black colleges and universities to promote health and modify risks for chronic diseases among individuals living in the surrounding communities.

The primary goal of the HBCU Wellness Project is to leverage educational and service- oriented resources at HBCUs to positively impact the health and well being of Tennessee residents. The HBCU Wellness Project is directed by Meharry Medical College and functions through four historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in Tennessee.

OBJECTIVES:

  • Conduct needs assessments for local communities and campuses.
  • Enhance the capacity of faculty to integrate service-learning into the curricula.
  • Recruit, train and guide student health ambassadors to develop health and wellness projects to promote readiness for change.
  • Assess short and long-term outcomes of service-learning activities in communities of color.
  • Develop and maintain a pipeline of students of color interested in entering health professions workforce.



LANE COLLEGE ALCOHOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

Did You Know?
The consequences of excessive drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not.

  • Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b; Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002), and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).
  • Drunk Driving: 3,360,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).
  • Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002), and 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).